These still life objects were 3D scanned and 3D printed out to record the initial point when they were settled on the table before the time lapse photo shoot started.

The installation consisted of interactive sculpture and projected screen on the wall. The audience needs to keep touching the objects to experience the time from the beginning to the end in the object’s view. When they stop touching, the interface will switch to the initial point. Every time they touch the object, the time lapse program will start from the beginning.

The audiences are invited to be part of the installation with a shorter lifespan than stone, longer lifespan than other four objects. They are considered to be the sixth matter.

The video was edited to show the information of each object. The slow and gradually increasing sound of the object is part of the time passing narrative.

Stone is an exception. Because stone won’t change in a short period of time. It is a reference to other objects. When touching the stone, stone remains the same. But all the other four objects show the change.

The objects were covered with a layer of conductive paint to realize the interaction touch response, and another layer of glossy white paint on top to make the material look similar to the table on screen.

All the objects were modeled in 3D software to hide the electric wires connected to them.

In this project, I learned a lot about electronic components, soldering, etc.

The touch reactions were controlled by touch sensor and Arduino board.

Although the time to implement our own thesis project was very limited. I still conducted the interactive installation in our classroom with the projector we used for class.

Still life is a form without time. It always connects with words like still, dead. In French still life is called “nature morte,” which literally means dead nature. For my project I tried to explore a new way to narrate time with this traditional static form. And with new technology I made a 3D still life project belong to this era.